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Economic Definition of Clayton Act. Defined.

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Term Clayton Act Definition: This antitrust law passed in 1914 outlawed specific practices designed to monopolize a market including price discrimination, exclusive agreements, tying contracts, mergers, and interlocking directorates. The Clayton Act was one of three major antitrust laws passed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The other two were the Sherman Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act. The specific practices outlawed were designed to correct flaws of the Sherman Act, especially vague wording about what constituting a monopoly. Moreover, while the Sherman Act outlawed monopoly after it emerged, the Clayton Act made practices that gave rise to monopoly control illegal.


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